Oct 12

Applying Cinematic Techniques to Craft Powerful Prose – October 14, 2017

“A film director controls a film’s artistic and dramatic aspects, and visualizes the script while guiding the technical crew and actors in the fulfillment of that vision. The director has a key role in choosing the cast members, production design, and the creative aspects of filmmaking.” – Wikipedia

Unlike a movie director, who works with a team of professionals, the prose writer takes on all the creative roles in their project — from producer and cinematographer, to costumes, sets, hair and make-up and (more often than we should!) caterer.

Without that crew and cast of thousands, how can a cinematic vision be applied to your writing? What can you learn from film directors that’ll enhance your work? Through the use of multiple YouTube videos*, we will discuss various directors and their approach to storytelling, specifically focusing on: action, pacing, opening and closing shots, aspect ratio, colour, sound, and other brilliant moments in cinema. At the end of this presentation, you will have the tools to use the cinematic eye of a film director to bring the power, intensity and immersiveness of movies to your own writing!

Before attending, you are encouraged to think of a scene you may be wanting to write or edit.

Nicole Winters has a B.A. in English and Visual Arts and is a PAN member with two YA novels under her belt, TT FULL THROTTLE, and her debut romance THE JOCK AND THE FAT CHICK. She is also the recipient of numerous award nominations for her screenwriting and received multiple rounds of funding from the Harold Greenberg Fund. She is currently working on her third YA novel, BREAKING, her first YA psychological horror.

http://torontoromancewriters.com/event/applying-cinematic-techniques-to-craft-powerful-prose/

https://www.facebook.com/torontoromancewriters/

October 14
1:00 pm – 4:00 pm
Northern District Library, Gwen Liu Meeting Room
40 Orchard View Boulevard
Toronto, Ontario M4R 1B9 Canada

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